163rd McSorley’s Old Ale House 2017 Calendar

QUIET LUNCH is pleased to present the 163rd McSorley’s Old Ale House 2017 Calendar featuring never before published photos of New York’s most iconic bar taken by legendary designer and corporate branding guru Arthur King (Citgo, Hertz, Aer Lingus, New York Life, Barilla, and the UK CO-OP are just some of his famous designs/branding credits) in the 1950’s while studying at Pratt Institute. New York was a different place back then, the drinking age all but eighteen, and the East Village—once home to countless flophouses—a different world. Gone are all the children of German, Ukrainian and Eastern European immigrants playing stickball in the streets, the old time newspaper men hawking the daily news for a nickel, the pickle guys selling half or full sour out of barrels on Second, and the Italian guys on 1st who built fires right on the Avenue to smoke their fresh mozzarella.

But one place, founded by an Irishman named John McSorley in 1854 at 15 East 7th Street, has remained pretty much unchanged since its founding and the photographs herein are testament to the bar’s longevity, uniqueness and special place in the history of a city that changes by the hour.

Purchase this limited edition calendar while supplies last shipping included. As a thank you for supporting both McSorley’s and Quiet Lunch, shipping will be free.

 
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INTRODUCING QL PRINTS

THE QUIET LUNCH PRINT SHOP


Recently discovered in the McSorley archives, Quiet Lunch is honored to offer these special McSorley’s Old Ale House photographs as fine art prints to the McSorley loving public. To purchase any of the Arthur King’s photos, we are offering an exclusive 15 x 15″ Quiet Lunch monogram print of the 12 photos featured in the 163rd McSorley’s Old Ale House 2017 Calendar. Send an email to our NEW PRINT SHOP, QL PRINTS by clicking HERE!

 

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Comments

  1. Minimum drinking age in the 1950’s was 21. It was lowered to 18 in most states after the voting age was changed from 21 to 18 in 1971.

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