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Tag Archives: Sculptures

Staying Healthy Keeps the Boss Wealthy.

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Share This.Tom Pregiato provides a visual response to keeping a healthy workplace. Featuring various vegetable sculptures re-purposed in a standard office setting and filtered through a lens of abstract portraiture, the series is delightfully stoic and somewhat sarcastic.

Degrees of Carafes. | #EtienneMeneau #Carafes #Wine #Vase

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Share This.Etienne Meneau‘s glass sculptures serve as functional art, doubling as a sculpture and an intriguing wine server.

Lumber Up.

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Share This.Paul Kaptein creates a limber piece out of lumber with his latest work. Made from lamented, handcarved wood, Limber is an awkward sculpture that implicitly offers a scientific documentation of movement.

Sculptures Assemble!

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Share This.Conceptually coarse, Meg Held‘s Assemblage_Sculptures bedevils traditional technique. The sculptures are made from salvaged odds and ends, but are arranged to resemble patterns found in a circuit board. The UK artist is known for reinventing and reviving existing objects, giving them new purpose and new life.  

Joe (Fig)ure.

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Share This.Joe Fig thinks smalls, and we mean that in a good way. Fig’s series of table sculptures (2003-2008) is a testament to the artist’s patience, skill, and attention to detail. Each piece is a miniature portrait of an artist’s workspace. From we gather, the titles indicate the artist that the piece is inspired by. If so, Fig’s table sculpture are not only brilliant, but intimate.

It’s a Small World After All.

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Share This.These diminutive sculptures by Isaac Cordal speak volumes about human race’s underlying insignificance. Although we strut around like we run the place, we are merely guest stars in a grand scheme–a grand scheme that is more intricate that we could ever imagine.  

Bag Laddy.

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Share This.Michael Johansson knows a thing or two about baggage–and we mean that not in an Erykah Badu sense, but in a literal sense. The Swedish artist has a propensity for “cubifying ” things. From Horror Vacui to Tetris, Johansson is obsessed with occupying every inch of geometric space. His newest installation, Crossfades (2012), is no different.

Yesterday’s Trash.

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Share This.Possessing a strong undercurrent of misogyny and sexism, Sit‘s Haiiro Trash series is off-putting, but nothing short of sheer genius. Essentially, it forces us to reflect on our agenda as a society. When it concerns the female form, we are constantly promoting notions of perfection, and flawlessness. We have branded women with an expiration date, making them useful for only a given period time. Yet another installation in the Haiiro collection, Read More

Sweet, Sweet Weaponry.

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Share This.Currently showing at Davidson Contemporary in New York City, Darren Lago’s Sugar attempts to redefine the often threatening nature of weapons–especially guns. “Their harmlessness is evident, and the declawed machismo of steel weaponry is transferred into gaudy yet seductive pastels and fruity hues.” – Darren Lago.  

Birthday.

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Share This.Artist, Anders Krisár, creates an odd pairing with the two sculptures being presented today. Titled, The Birth of Us (Boy) and The Birth of Us (Girl), the sculptures are both made from acrylic paint on polyester resin, fiberglass, oil paint, screw eye, steel wire, and wire lock. We honestly can’t even begin to interpret these pieces because they are so many possibilities. The pieces could be referencing to creation, sexism, gender differentiation–even pedophilia.