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HBO’s Fahrenheit 451 is All Smoke With No Fire

In Crumbs, Film, Literature. by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

There was a moment during the HBO film adaptation of the Ray Bradbury classic Fahrenheit 451 that I audibly groaned. Up until that point, I had been enjoying seeing the establishment of this dystopia and the struggle of it’s characters come to grips with its oppressiveness. There was subtle social commentary sprinkled here and there, and I enjoyed connecting the …

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Sex and the City Isn’t As Irrelevant As Its Current Detractors (Sarah Jessica Parker Included) Are Making It Out to Be

In Film, The Menu. by Genna RivieccioLeave a Comment

As even Sarah Jessica Parker cowers to the juggernaut of gender fluidity and racial inclusivity that has rendered all pop culture offerings of the past utterly obsolete, one can’t deny that there are still many beacons of truth contained within the show that made daft white girls everywhere want to move to New York. And yes, Carrie Bradshaw (Parker) was the …

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Sara Driver: For Real

In Film, The Entree., The Menu., Visual Arts. by Jennifer Parker1 Comment

Sara Driver is one of the most relevant and underappreciated filmmakers of a generation. Take Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat, her documentary piecing together the life of an artist and friend before he became famous. Driver who has witnessed decay and regrowth in New York City since being a grad student at NYU circa Jim …

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5 Things We Learned From the Westworld Season 2 Premiere (And 3 Things We Didn’t)

In Crumbs, Film by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

Sunday night was the premiere of “Journey Into the Night”- the first episode of the HBO hit show Westworld’s second season. The show’s writers (Jonathan Nolan, Lisa Joy, and Halley Wegryn Gross) spent the better part of 2016 crafting an extremely tight story throughout the span of the first season. Weaving its characters through the vicious and violent world of …

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Tribeca Film Festival: Docs to Watch

In Film, The Menu. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Tribeca is probably one of the most curated film festivals in the best of ways for everyone but cinephiles who have to make a decision about how to be two places at once. For documentary junkies, you might as well put a blindfold on, spin around three times and pin a tail on the schedule. There are too many stand-outs …

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Don’t Pass Over Pass Over

In Film, The Menu. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

What do you get when you combine Waiting for Godot, current American race issues, and Biblical lore into a narrative that’s at times hilarious, suspenseful and quirky? You get Antoinette Nwandu’s Pass Over, produced in 2017 by Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre and directed by Spike Lee. The direction delivers the intensity of Nwandu’s play—given life by actors Julian Parker and Jon …

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Negotiating with Nature. (Film Review)

In Film, The Menu. by Chiara Isabella Spagnoli GabardiLeave a Comment

Negotiating with Nature fully captures today’s main issue: mankind’s current Weltanschauung clashes with the way nature works. Filmmaker Stefan van Norden has the lyrical objectivity and open-minded poetry to lead audiences through a narrative of awakening. This suave documentary is an ode to nature and a call to action for the natural environment’s renewal and survival of all living beings. …

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Ready Player One: The Modern Day Coin-Op

In Crumbs, Film by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

As you can tell from my reviews for Pacific Rim: Uprising and A Wrinkle In Time, films which use nostalgia or adaptations of popular kid’s books can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, you have the happy thoughts and all of the warmth that comes along with a trip down memory lane. On the other, you have the realization that …

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Listiography: Egg Hunting in Ready Player One

In Crumbs, Film by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

This weekend, audiences are lining up to watch the Steven Spielberg directed adaptation of Ernest Cline’s nostalgia-fest Ready Player One. There’s a lot to love here. With Spielberg at the helm and Cline co-writing, the film might be one of the few film adaptations to stick the landing. While I’m busy writing up the film and chopping it up into …

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Top SXSW Docs: The Cook, a Music Icon, his DJ and Six Documentaries

In Film, Music. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Some SXSW Highlights The 2018 Tribeca Film Festival is a few weeks away from beginning on April 18 with a slate of over 550 films and talks to navigate and expected attendance over 150K people.  It follows a hiccup after South by Southwest. SXSW or as actor/comedian Nick Offerman calls it, sexswa is a conference, exhibition and interactive, film, music and …

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The Case for The Neurotic Quest for Serenity

In Film, The Menu. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Imagine you’re a “medium-pretty” actress who is always worried about losing her role to another actress, not hard, right? Turn that worry into a full-blown, post-apocalyptic, Mad Max- like reoccurring nightmare complete with costumes and stunt people and you begin to understand the depth of Kika’s anxiety. In her non-dream life, she is being stalked by a super-fan, Filipão. She’s …

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Just A Wrinkle: Why Disney’s Newest Adaptation Shows the Flaws of Bringing Classics to Theaters

In Crumbs, Film, Literature., The Menu. by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

When it was announced that Disney was finally bringing a film adaptation of bring the beloved classic “A Wrinkle in Time” to the big screen, fans rejoiced. Adding Ava DuVernay (director of the 2015 film Selma) to the fold as the director seemed liked icing on the cake. With DuVernay’s eye and a Disney budget, it was safe to bank …

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Leaning into the Wind

In Film, The Entree., The Menu. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

There are more than a few ways to go about making a documentary about an artist. There’s the dead artist documentary, the living artist documentary and what he (and maybe every once in a while, she) has done thus far with his life—either pre-success or post and then there’s the slice-of-life look. The beauty of the latter is that context …

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The Beauty of Culture and Conflict in Marvel’s Black Panther

In Crumbs, Film, The Menu. by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

There were a few moments while watching Black Panther (2018, dir. Ryan Coogler) in which I found myself laughing out loud in the theater, and it wasn’t because there was anything particularly humorous happening on screen. I mostly laughed because I wondered how director Ryan Coogler was able to accomplish something so simple and yet still unheard of during my …

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The Party, Not So Black and White | Film Review

In Film, The Menu. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Unpack this: You do look slightly ministerial in that pinny—in a 21st century, post-modern, post, post, feminist sort of way. Says Patricia Clarkson’s character, April to her BFF, Janet, albeit the woman who is about to prove that you can still get your ephemeral feelings in a world of hurt when you find out that your husband has been keeping secrets …

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Film Poetics: Spotlight on Guillermo del Toro

In Crumbs, Film, The Menu. by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

“Film poetics” is a term which runs parallel to the David Bordwell theory of the “historical poetics of cinema” in that it looks at the specifics of film production. Film poetics takes this a step further in stating that everything that goes into a film (set design, writing, lighting, wardrobe) harmonizes with the vision of its director to create one …

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The Big Picture | Faces Places (Review)

In Crumbs, Film, Visual Arts. by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Faces Places is the little documentary that could. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, the filmmakers transform the quotidian into objects of fascination. There’s an inherent narcissism about making a film about the process of making art yet the subjects are so lacking in ego yet charming that it’s a delight to watch. JR and Agnès Varda …