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Mori’s Morose Musings.

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Cattolica native, Virginia Mori, is not one for much color or explanation. She isn’t into bending and twisting your mind with fanciful feats and artful acrobatics. Mori’s agenda is a simple one–move the pen; move the audience.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Virginia Mori‘s muted taste for gore is merely a plus. What is most striking about her work is her masterful use of the ball point pen. While other artists are currently enthralled with use of mixed media–which is a figurative way of carrying as many different guns as you can–Mori has stuck to her trusty six shooter. Finding ourselves very intrigued with her work, we decided to catch up with Mori and ask her few question about her process and the seemingly violent motif  that is present throughout most of her pieces.

What is the inspiration behind most of your work?

“The most part of my work is inspired by music, fables,childhood and my intimistic obsessions and nightmares…”

Why do use a ballpoint pen? Why not a pencil, paint or graphite?

“I don’t know… I start drawing some years ago with black pen and I found it good, I don’t care about the instruments–I care about ideas. I think that in this moment a simple pen is enough to represent my ideas.”

What would you say to someone who calls your work violent?

“…that also some aspects of life are violent and  I want to represent also these aspects.”

What would you like your audience to take away from your work?

“Feelings.”

Like we mentioned earlier, Mori is not one for beating around the bush.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

At first, you almost feel as if Mori is hiding something. But as you take the time to connect her words with her work, you see that they are both very much one in the same. Mori, and her work, are sharp, terse and plagued with dry wit. With Mori, there are no frills, no additives–just unequivocal genius cloaked in abstract torment.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

To tie it all in with the last piece being presented, Mori’s work in itself is a suffocating affair. Despite its stoic nature, it is the violent outbursts that keep us drawn to Mori’s work as a whole. It is the detached insanity of it all that keeps us enveloped in Mori’s nightmare.

Courtesy of Virginia Mori.

Written by Akeem K. Duncan.↓

Akeem K. Duncan (n.): editor in chief; despised by most of the staff.

About Akeem K. Duncan.

Akeem K. Duncan.
Akeem is our Editor in Chief. A writing ogre and profuse sweater, he is responsible for the daily function and overall misdirection of Quiet Lunch. When he’s not perusing the worldwide web for “documentaries on intercourse”, he can be often found holed up in various friend’s apartments organizing content or tweaking the site.

Comment (1)

  • Ignatus November 22, 2012 - 12:28 pm Reply

    Virginia-Mori-5-e1351623868944.jpg Жалко кроля.

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